A study of a microorganic that feeds on human waste has found it can cause the health of people around it to deteriorate.

The study, published in the journal Science, was conducted by scientists at the University of Oxford, which are studying the microbial life of composting material, which is found in composts produced by the human body.

“Our study suggests that a bacteria that feeds directly on human-collected organic matter can be an important cause of health problems,” said lead author Dr Caroline Wilson, from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the university.

“We want to know more about the microorganisms that are involved in human-contaminated compost, and the mechanisms that they are using to survive.” “

The team examined the bacteria in compost and compared them to the bacteria that live in human guts, including gut microbes that can lead to colitis and other digestive problems. “

We want to know more about the microorganisms that are involved in human-contaminated compost, and the mechanisms that they are using to survive.”

The team examined the bacteria in compost and compared them to the bacteria that live in human guts, including gut microbes that can lead to colitis and other digestive problems.

It found that bacteria in the compost microaerophages, or microaerosols, were able to survive in a range of environments, including the gut, the lungs, and even the human digestive system.

These microorganisms were found to be capable of degrading human cells, and their ability to survive, despite their being present in the environment, could be linked to their ability, through evolution, to produce toxins and damage DNA, the team found.

The research is the first to show that the microorganisms in compost can be the cause of serious health effects.

“These are the first microbial organisms that we have found that are causing problems in humans,” said co-author Professor Ian Huggins, from Oxford’s Department of Microbiology.

They found that a microaerophile was able to destroy the DNA of human cells in their environment. “

This work is important to understanding the potential of microorganisms as part of a wider suite of environmental factors.”

They found that a microaerophile was able to destroy the DNA of human cells in their environment.

They also found that it could use these harmful microorganisms to produce a toxin.

The team say that it’s important to take the work seriously, and that the findings should be taken seriously.

“If you are a patient in a hospital, this study is likely to have an impact on your care,” said Dr Wilson.

The research has been published in Nature Microbiology, and was supported by the UK’s National Institute for Health Research. “

Even if you think that the problem is caused by these microbes, it is very likely that they can be producing harmful toxins, and if you don’t want to be exposed to this potentially dangerous and damaging microorganisms it’s worth taking them seriously.”

The research has been published in Nature Microbiology, and was supported by the UK’s National Institute for Health Research.

More information about the study can be found at the Oxford University website.

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